Category Archives: Education

This Graphic Lists Over 200 Resources for Making Money Online

This Graphic Lists Over 200 Resources for Making Money Online

This Graphic Lists Over 200 Resources for Making Money Online

There are tons of ways to make money online, in your spare time and maybewith very little effort. From freelancing to flipping sites, this infographic covers the major resources that can help you put more money in your bank account.

The 200+ resources compiled by SurveySpencer.com include sites where you can earn money: freelancing (as a writer, designer, programmer, etc.), recommending products (affiliate marketing and CPA or cost-per-action marketing), adding content to network sites, creating videos, and flipping your web properties.

Here’s the full graphic—note: split into two parts due to image issues. (Click the Expand button on the top left of each part to see it larger)

This Graphic Lists Over 200 Resources for Making Money Online

This Graphic Lists Over 200 Resources for Making Money Online

Perhaps this will jump start some ideas for your online money-making future. Check out Survey Spencer’s post for descriptions of each resource and type of online business.

As posted on http://lifehacker.com/

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Holiday Seasons is coming!! Bond your family together with these simple dinner games.

Fun & Games
Image source: thefamilydinnerproject.org

Games can bring a whole new sense of fun to dinner.

Whether you feel you’ve hit a dinner rut, want a break from “serious conversation,” or simply want to bring more joy to the table, games work wonders. Take a break from the stresses of work and school, and help everyone connect through laughing together. The next time you’re craving some dinner fun, give one of these activities a try:

Rose & Thorn (all ages)
Ask your kids to tell you about the rose (the best or most special part of their day), and the thorn (the most difficult part of their day). This can be a great way to get around one-word answers when you ask, “How was your day?” It helps everyone think about sharing their day in a new way.

Alphabet Game (ages 3-8)
As a group, choose a category, such as animals, countries, singers, or “people our family knows.” One family member starts the game by naming a person/thing from that category that starts with the letter “A.” Then the next person names a person/thing that starts with the letter “B,” the next person finds something for the letter “C,” and so on.

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Image source: thefamilydinnerproject.org


I-Spy (ages 3-8)

Another fun, classic game. One person starts by saying, “I spy with my little eye, something…”, and adds a description of an object he’s looking at (for instance, “I spy with my little eye, something blue and fuzzy!”). Everyone at the table tries to guess what the person is looking at. You can go around the circle, letting each family member have a chance to be the “spy-er.”




List Game (ages 3-8)
Think of 5 things that “belong” to something. For example, a banana, a pair of shoes, a Harry Potter book, a pile of paperclips, and a box of flooring. Then have your family guess what these things belong to (answer: things in the trunk of my car). With little kids, you can just ask them outright for a list of things in a category (example: name three things in your bed).

Telephone (ages 3-12)
This classic game was practically made for the dinner table. Have one person think of a sentence or phrase, and have him whisper it into the next person’s ear. When the last person hears the phrase, she repeats it to the group, and the person who started the game can see how close she got!

Would You Rather (all ages)
Take turns asking “Would you rather….?” questions. You can either purchase a book of these questions, or make them up as a family. A few ideas to start:

  • Would you rather be invisible or able to fly?
  • Would you rather sweat melted cheese or always smell skunk?
  • Would you rather be able to swim like a dolphin or run as fast as a cheetah?

Create a Story (all ages)
One person starts a story with one sentence. They can use a traditional story format (“Once upon a time, there was a huge bear…”) or something completely original (“A woman carrying a large cake was walking down the street…”). Go around the table, and have each person add a sentence to the story. If the kids are old enough, pass a piece of paper around, and have everyone write their sentence down. After dinner, you can illustrate the sentences, and then post your drawings on the fridge.




Higglety Pigglety (all ages)
One person thinks of a rhyming pair of words, and then gives clues about them, using synonyms. For example, if the secret phrase was “funny bunny,” the clue might be “hilarious furry mammal.” The person can also give a clue about how many syllables the secret phrase has by shortening or lengthening the game’s title. Saying “hig pig” means that each word in the secret phrase has one syllable (like “old mold,”), whereas “higgy piggy” means words with two syllables (“chipper zipper”), and higglety pigglety means words with three (“triumphant elephant”).

Where in the World? (all ages)
Imagine everyone at the table has the gift of teleportation, but it only lasts for 24 hours. Where in the world would you go? Would you bring anyone with you? How long would you stay? What would you do there?

Two Truths and a Tall Tale (all ages)
Have each family member think of two true facts about themselves, and one made-up fact (a “tall tale”). Go around the table and share your three items. The other family members have to guess which one isn’t true!

Ask Your Kids (all ages)
Your children are also likely to know a few games, either from school or playing with friends. Ask them if they have a game they’d like to try at the dinner table!




Originally posted on thefamilydinnerproject.org

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4 Reading Hacks Every Book Lover Should Know

 

 

 

1. When You Can’t Read… Listen!

Image result for reading books
Image Source: encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

Audiobooks are the answer for people who always want to be reading. Amazon’s Whispersync lets you sync your ebooks with the audiobook version so you don’t have to waste frustrating minutes trying to find your place in the audiobook. Now, there’s also OverDrive, which allows you to break free of Amazon and sync ebooks and audiobooks for other platforms. So, you can read your ebook on the train and listen to the audiobook during your run, or, with bluetooth shower speakers, even in the shower!




2. Read Big Books In Tiny Pieces

If you’re intimidated by the size of Ulysses or just don’t want to strain your wrist or weigh down your backpack with you books, the DailyLit app will send you short installments of books at regular times that you choose. You pick the book, you determine how many pages you can read at a time and when you can read them, and DailyLit will get you the right amount of reading at the right time.

3. Read While You Wait
You might not always have time to set aside to get cozy and read for an hour, but everyone has several chunks of a few minutes here or there throughout the day — 10 minutes of waiting in lines, waiting for the pasta to boil, while you do laundry, waiting for the train to arrive, waiting for your (ahem) bathroom business to conduct itself. Instead of checking for new emails for the hundredth time, crack open your book. All those 10 minutes add up, and before you realize it you’ll be halfway through your bookshelf of unread classics.




4. Lock Yourself Out of Your Phone

Look, we’re living in an online world and you’re just an online girl. We alll fall victim to the evil addiction of scrolling. Even with a book in hand you may soon find yourself swiping and tapping and checking your e-mail just one more time, you know, in case there’s something life-alteringly important. You’d think getting some offline time might be as simple as turning off the phone, but we’re all weak weak creatures who can’t deny the allure of Facebook or a perfect emoji text. That’s where apps come in handy. Apps like Flipd, App Detox, or even a straight up Parental Control app let you control how much time you spend online, on certain apps, or even just lock you out of your phone automatically at certain times of the day. It’s basically like putting a Do Not Disturb sign on your little window to the Internet. Finally free of the urge to status update, you can dive into a good old-fashioned hardcover.

Originally posted on bustle.com

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Re-reading is inefficient. Here are 8 tips for studying smarter.

The way most students study makes no sense.

That’s the conclusion of Washington University in St. Louis psychologists Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel — who’ve spent a combined 80 years studying learning and memory, and recently distilled their findings with novelist Peter Brown in the book

USING ACTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES IS MOST EFFECTIVE

The majority of students study by re-reading notes and textbooks — but the psychologists’ research, both in lab experiments and of actual students in classes, shows this is a terrible way to learn material. Using active learning strategies — like flashcards, diagramming, and quizzing yourself — is much more effective, as is spacing out studying over time and mixing different topics together.


McDaniel spoke with me about the eight key tips he’d share with students and teachers from his body of research.

1) Don’t just re-read your notes and readings

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Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

“We know from surveys that a majority of students, when they study, they typically re-read assignments and notes. Most students say this is their number one go-to strategy.

WHEN STUDENTS RE-READ A TEXTBOOK CHAPTER, THEY SHOW NO IMPROVEMENT IN LEARNING

“We know, however, from a lot of research, that this kind of repetitive recycling of information is not an especially good way to learn or create more permanent memories. Our studies of Washington University students, for instance, show that when they re-read a textbook chapter, they have absolutely no improvement in learning over those who just read it once.


“On your first reading of something, you extract a lot of understanding. But when you do the second reading, you read with a sense of ‘I know this, I know this.’ So basically, you’re not processing it deeply, or picking more out of it. Often, the re-reading is cursory — and it’s insidious, because this gives you the illusion that you know the material very well, when in fact there are gaps.”

2) Ask yourself lots of questions

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Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe via Getty Images

“One good technique to use instead is to read once, then quiz yourself, either using questions at the back of a textbook chapter, or making up your own questions. Retrieving that information is what actually produces more robust learning and memory.

RETRIEVING INFORMATION IS WHAT PRODUCES MORE ROBUST LEARNING AND MEMORY

“And even when you can’t retrieve it — when you get the questions wrong — it gives you an accurate diagnostic on what you don’t know, and this tells you what you should go back and study. This helps guide your studying more effectively.

“Asking questions also helps you understand more deeply. Say you’re learning about world history, and how ancient Rome and Greece were trading partners. Stop and ask yourself why they became trading partners. Why did they become shipbuilders, and learn to navigate the seas? It doesn’t always have to be why — you can ask how, or what.


“In asking these questions, you’re trying to explain, and in doing this, you create a better understanding, which leads to better memory and learning. So instead of just reading and skimming, stop and ask yourself things to make yourself understand the material.”

3) Connect new information to something you already know

“Another strategy is, during a second reading, to try relating the principles in the text to something you already know about. Relate new information to prior information for better learning.

“One example is if you were learning about how the neuron transmits electricity. One of the things we know if that if you have a fatty sheath surround the neuron, called a myelin sheath, it helps the neuron transmit electricity more quickly.

“So you could liken this, say, to water running through a hose. The water runs quickly through it, but if you puncture the hose, it’s going to leak, and you won’t get the same flow. And that’s essentially what happens when we age — the myelin sheaths break down, and transmissions become slower.”

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(Quasar/Wikimedia Commons)

4) Draw out the information in a visual form

“A great strategy is making diagrams, or visual models, or flowcharts. In a beginning psychology course, you could diagram the flow of classical conditioning. Sure, you can read about classical conditioning, but to truly understand it and be able to write down and describe the different aspects of it on a test later on — condition, stimulus, and so on — it’s a good idea to see if you can put it in a flowchart.

“Anything that creates active learning — generating understanding on your own — is very effective in retention. It basically means the learner needs to become more involved and more engaged, and less passive.”

5) Use flashcards

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Deb Stgo

“Flashcards are another good way of doing this. And one key to using them is actually re-testing yourself on the ones you got right.

KEEPING A CORRECT CARD IN THE DECK AND ENCOUNTERING IT AGAIN IS MORE USEFUL

“A lot of students will answer the question on a flashcard, and take it out of the deck if they get it right. But it turns out this isn’t a good idea — repeating the act of memory retrieval is important. Studies show that keeping the correct item in the deck and encountering it again is useful. You might want to practice the incorrect items a little more, but repeated exposure to the ones you get right is important too.

“It’s not that repetition as a whole is bad. It’s that mindless repetition is bad.”

6) Don’t cram — space out your studying

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Johannes Simon/Getty Images

“A lot of students cram — they wait until the last minute, then in one evening, they repeat the information again and again. But research shows this isn’t good for long term memory. It may allow you to do okay on that test the next day, but then on the final, you won’t retain as much information, and then the next year, when you need the information for the next level course, it won’t be there.

PRACTICE A LITTLE BIT ONE DAY, THEN TWO DAYS LATER

“This often happens in statistics. Students come back for the next year, and it seems like they’ve forgotten everything, because they crammed for their tests.

“The better idea is to space repetition. Practice a little bit one day, then put your flashcards away, then take them out the next day, then two days later. Study after study shows that spacing is really important.”

7) Teachers should space out and mix up their lessons too

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Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images

“Our book also has information for teachers. And our educational system tends to promote massed presentation of information as well.




“In a typical college course, you cover one topic one day, then on the second day, another topic, then on the third day, another topic. This is massed presentation. You never go back and recycle or reconsider the material.

“But the key, for teachers, is to put the material back in front of a student days or weeks later. There are several ways they can do this. Here at Washington University, there are some instructors who give weekly quizzes, and used to just put material from that week’s classes on the quiz. Now, they’re bringing back more material from two to three weeks ago. One psychology lecturer explicitly takes time, during each lecture, to bring back material from days or weeks beforehand.

THE KEY, FOR TEACHERS, IS TO PUT THE MATERIAL BACK IN FRONT OF A STUDENT DAYS OR WEEKS LATER

“This can be done in homework too. It’s typical, in statistics courses, to give homework in which all of the problems are all in the same category. After correlations are taught, a student’s homework, say, is problem after problem on correlation. Then the next week, T tests are taught, and all the problems are on T tests. But we’ve found that sprinkling in questions on stuff that was covered two or three weeks ago is really good for retention.

“And this can be built into the content of lessons themselves. Let’s say you’re taking an art history class. When I took it, I learned about Gauguin, then I saw lots of his paintings, then I moved on to Matisse, and saw lots of paintings by him. Students and instructors both think that this is a good way of learning the painting styles of these different artists.

“But experimental studies show that’s not the case at all. It’s better to give students an example of one artist, then move to another, then another, then recycle back around. That interspersing, or mixing, produces much better learning that can be transferred to paintings you haven’t seen — letting students accurately identify the creators of paintings, say, on a test.

“And this works for all sorts of problems. Let’s go back to statistics. In upper level classes, and the real world, you’re not going to be told what sort of statistical problem you’re encountering — you’re going to have to figure out the method you need to use. And you can’t learn how to do that unless you have experience dealing with a mix of different types of problems, and diagnosing which requires which type of approach.”

8) There’s no such thing as a “math person”

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

“There’s some really interesting work by Carol Dweck, at Stanford. She’s shown that students tend to have one of two mindsets about learning.

IT TURNS OUT THAT MINDSETS PREDICT HOW WELL STUDENTS END UP DOING

“One is a fixed learning model. It says, ‘I have a certain amount of talent for this topic — say, chemistry or physics — and I’ll do well until I hit that limit. Past that, it’s too hard for me, and I’m not going to do well.’ The other mindset is a growth mindset. It says that learning involves using effective strategies, putting aside time to do the work, and engaging in the process, all of which help you gradually increase your capacity for a topic.

“It turns out that the mindsets predict how well students end up doing. Students with growth mindsets tend to stick with it, tend to persevere in the face of difficulty, and tend to be successful in challenging classes. Students with the fixed mindset tend not to.




“So for teachers, the lesson is that if you can talk to students and suggest that a growth mindset really is the more accurate model — and it is — then students tend to be more open to trying new strategies, and sticking with the course, and working in ways that are going to promote learning. Ability, intelligence, and learning have to do with how you approach it — working smarter, we like to say.”

Originally posted on www.vox.com

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